Forlorn bluebells

We still have snow on the ground after a week. This morning I went for an 11Km run in the woods and along the river bank. Where the snow was undisturbed, footfall produced a satisfying crunchy sound, but along the more heavily trampled paths, the compacted snow had become a treacherous sheet of ice. It was necessary to run with a high cadence and short steps, focusing on a allowing only a short time on stance in order to stay upright. In the woods, the bluebell shoots that had appeared prematurely a few weeks ago were struggling gamely to poke their leaf tips through the blanket of snow.

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5 Responses to “Forlorn bluebells”

  1. ajh Says:

    I haven’t run in snow since I was a child in England. I’d welcome the opportunity right now.

  2. canute1 Says:

    Andrew, I have happy childhood memories of hot Australian summers, but the recent temperatures above 46 degrees C in Melbourne sound diabolical, and what it must be like fighting bushfires in those temperatures is unimaginable.

  3. Ewen Says:

    In Canberra I’ve run in snow (when it was snowing) 3 or 4 times. Sadly, not enough on the ground to be crunchy.

    I’m starting to think climate change is making cold places colder and warm places warmer.

  4. Helen Says:

    Snowdrop hunting today, but I did notice the bluebells’ young snouts, just as you describe. I left the woods with that nice sense of anticipation.

  5. canute1 Says:

    Ewen, One prediction for the UK is that the cooler water released by polar melting with disrupt the Gulf Stream which delivers warm water to western seaboard of the UK, so colder winters will become more frequent. Whether or not altered flow in the Gulf Stream has contributed to the cold UK winter this year is debateable. However,whatever our fate in the UK, I fear that the consequences of global warming will become serious in Australia sooner
    Helen, It is good to hear that you have been ‘hunting snowdrops’ in the woods;I hope that you are able to enjoy long runs in the woods again well before the spring arrives.

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